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Toronto Centre Federal Liberal Association

Update from Kristyn Wong-Tam, Ward 27 Councillor

Posted on January 19, 2012

 

Welcome Letter from Councillor Wong-Tam

1.     Budget 2012

2.     The Ontario Municipal Board

3.     Rosedale Playground

4.     McAlpine Streets Rejuvenation

5.     Milkman’s Lane Reconstruction

6.     2011 Cavalcade of Lights

7.     Homewood and Wellesley Traffic Prohibition

8.     Traffic Lights at Yonge and Roxborough

9.     Allan Gardens – The Jewel of the Downtown East

10.  Bell Equipment Box Murals

11.  Community Planning Meeting Update

12.  Downtown East Planning Review

13.  Yonge Street Planning Study and Framework

14.  Cawthra Park Improvements

15.  Church and Wellesley Safety Audit

16.  Compost in Summerhill

17.  Let It Snow. Let It Snow. Let It Snow.

18.  South Rosedale Gateway Project

19.  Ontario Legislative Assembly Study

20.  Rinks Across Ward 27

21.  Strengthening Ravine Bylaws

22.  New Heritage Conservation District Guidelines

23.  5-Year Review of the City of Toronto’s Official Plan

24.  Overnight On-Street Parking Permits Now Available

25.  The City’s New Graffiti Management Plan

26.  Toronto Community Housing (TCH) and Home Sales

27.  Child Care Task Force

28.  Development Sites Update

 

 

 

 

Dear Friends, Residents and Businesses,

 

It is the new year and a time to look forward to the opportunities ahead. The last year has seen a remarkable amount of activity in Ward 27 and 2012 is shaping up to be just as significant for our neighbourhoods and the city.

 

At City Hall, I can report that we are seeing real progress with establishing new and consistent guidelines for Heritage Conservation Districts that will help us preserve vital historical neighbourhoods for generations to come. I am working with other progressive councillors to keep libraries open across the city that may be faced with closures. My motion to remove Toronto from the jurisdiction of the Ontario Municipal Board was unanimously passed at the Planning and Growth Management Committee and will come to Council for a vote after the 2012 budget.

 

Locally, we had a very successful gardening initiative in Summerhill and can celebrate the tremendous work of the North Rosedale Ratepayer’s Association in building a new playground in Rosedale Park. In addition, I have been advocating for the South Rosedale Ratepayer’s Association’s desire to install a significant neighbourhood gateway marker on Crescent Road. Planning has started for an exciting new playground in Allan Gardens and Bell utility boxes have been made into community works of art.

 

While many things are going well locally, there are real challenges facing our Ward and the city. The core services review, launched by the Mayor’s office, is now being implemented through the budget process and important services are facing deep budget cuts. This will negatively impact public transportation, children’s programs, daycare, long-term care, shelter services, libraries, public health, urban planning, parks, forestry, recreation, community outreach programs, and many other areas that are essential to sustaining Toronto as a vibrant and compassionate city. The Moore Park Lawn Bowling Club and other groups like them in the city have already been challenged with cutbacks. I continue to support them in their efforts to serve the community.

 

As a city that prides itself on its accomplishments, we will have to come together in the coming months and years in a way we have not for quite some time- to make sure that the most vulnerable families do not fall behind; to make sure that a generation does not lose access to something as simple as their morning breakfasts; to begin rebuilding a dialogue where we remember what we are capable of achieving together.

 

Please enjoy this newsletter and visit our website for community updates at www.ward27news.ca. I am grateful for the wonderful neighbourhoods I have had the opportunity to serve this past year.

 

Respectfully yours,

 

Kristyn Wong-Tam

 

 

 

1.    Budget 2012

 

The budget process is now well under way at City Hall and many groups are getting prepared to deal with a time of fiscal hardship ahead. Cutbacks of ten percent have been applied to the majority of departments throughout Toronto and will be felt quite strongly in areas such as childhood nutrition, community HIV/AIDS programs, TTC service reductions and fare increases, as well as in layoffs that will terminate thousands of jobs in the City. A proposed 2.5% property tax increase will be implemented, simultaneously.

 

This budget will be a challenge without recent precedent in the City. Councillor Wong-Tam is committing herself to fighting for the programs that have made living in the city viable for so many and have enhanced the quality of life for everyone. In conjunction with Ward 20 Councillor Adam Vaughan, and Ward 28 Councillor Pam McConnell, Councillor Wong-Tam held a public meeting to discuss budget measures on January 4th (6pm) at City Hall. As this has been one of the most rushed budgets to-date and only had its first public deputations on December 7th, our meeting enabled the community to air some of their very real concerns.

 

City Council will be voting on the budget January 17th, 18th and 19th and Councillor Wong-Tam will be fighting for the best outcome possible until the end.

2.    The Ontario Municipal Board

 

On November 8, 2011, a motion that Councillor Wong-Tam initiated at City Council in September, seconded by Councillor Matlow, to remove Toronto from the jurisdiction of the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) and ask the Province of Ontario to abolish the OMB was considered and adopted by the Planning and Growth Committee (PGM) with amendments.

 

The OMB is a provincially-appointed tribunal that has final decision-making authority over appeals of municipal legislation in several areas including land-use development. As an unelected entity, the OMB creates substantial barriers for communities to democratically decide the course of planning and development within their neighbourhoods and the city.

 

This motion was deferred by City Council on November 29, 2011 to the City Council meeting at its first session in 2012. Through this initiative, Councillor Wong-Tam hopes that Toronto’s communities can get a much stronger say in processes of change and development.

3.    Rosedale Playground

 

Councillor Wong-Tam is delighted to announce the completion of the new children’s playground in Rosedale Park. The renovation of the playground was made possible through the successful fundraising efforts by the North Rosedale Ratepayers’ Association (NRRA). The NRRA has worked hard with area residents and City of Toronto staff to redevelop the playground as a welcoming, safe and exciting environment for children, their parents and caregivers for many years to come. Congratulations!

4.    McAlpine Street Rejuvenation

 

Thanks to the strong leadership and guidance of Taylor Property management for 3 McAlpine, ABC Residents’ Association, Domus in Yorkville, Belmont House, Greater Yorkville Residents’ Association, Scott Torrence Landscape Architect, city staff from Transportation Services, and a very dedicated group of volunteers, Yorkville will soon be seeing improvements along McAlpine Street. Their guidance will result in improvements including the planting of new trees, while protecting a large number of existing ones, the construction of new seating for local residents, fence improvements, and new planting. These changes will help to beautify the neighbourhood.

5.    Milkman’s Lane Reconstruction

 

Milkman’s Lane is a 300m, 3m wide gravel surface trail in Rosedale entering the Don Valley from South Drive near Craigleigh Gardens Park. The trail is well-used by hikers, dog-walkers, cyclists and joggers connecting the community to the Don Valley trail network and the Don Valley Brick Works.

 

The City of Toronto’s Natural Environment and Community Programs section of Urban Forestry and the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority recently completed the reconstruction of Milkman’s Lane to resolve erosion, safety and ravine protection issues. The construction included the installation of swales, resurfacing, and new post and paddle fencing.

 

For more information please contact:

Scott Laver

Natural Environment and Community Programs

Phone: 416 338 5053

Email: trails@toronto.ca

 

6.    2011 Cavalcade of Lights

Councillor Wong-Tam congratulates the Rosedale Main Street BIA on their success in hosting the Cavalcade of Lights on Saturday, November 26, 2011. The Councillor was delighted to once again attend last year’s festivities and would like to thank all sponsors, merchants and residents for their efforts in supporting this annual event.

7.    Homewood and Wellesley Traffic Prohibition

 

In the Spring of 2011, we had notified you of a request from the Homewood Maitland Safety Association for a traffic prohibition at Homewood Avenue and Wellesley Street East to discourage vehicle circulation related to sex trade activity in the neighbourhood.  The proposal would be to prohibit westbound left turns, eastbound right turns and southbound through movements from Wellesley Street East onto Homewood Avenue from 11:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m., Monday to Sunday.

 

Councillor Wong-Tam heard from many residents about this proposal and it appears the community is divided on this issue.  The item was deferred at Toronto and East York Community Council (TEYCC) to provide Councillor Wong-Tam an opportunity to meet with a working group comprised of local residents and a community agency supporting sex workers in order to address some of the concerns relating to vandalism, trespassing and noise disturbances.

 

Councillor Wong-Tam learned that this traffic proposal was raised in 2008, but no opinion poll of local residents was conducted.   As a result, 1800 ballots were mailed out by the Councillor to residents in the Homewood and Wellesley neighbourhood to solicit their input on the traffic proposal.  On October 12th, 2011, Councillor Wong-Tam held a public meeting at the Wellesley Community Centre to invite residents to share their views with her.

 

The ballot results were 52 percent against the turn prohibition, 48 percent in favour. Councillor Wong-Tam took her direction from the community and the prohibition was not brought into effect. It is her ongoing pledge to the neighbourhood to continue working to find alternative solutions to these concerns.

 

8.    Traffic Lights at Yonge and Roxborough

 

Recently, construction began on a new set of traffic lights at the intersection of Yonge and Roxborough. Community feedback alerted Councillor Wong-Tam’s office to a number of concerns regarding a lack of engagement with local residents. The Councillor directed her own staff and city staff to look into this project and is meeting with stakeholders to develop solutions.

 

In addressing past complaints and a record of traffic accidents at the intersection, it appears that a number of important concerns about traffic impacts on Roxborough West were not addressed. As Councillor Wong-Tam convenes meetings and facilitates dialogue over the next several weeks, options for mitigating these concerns will be gathered together to create a solution that meets the needs of all stakeholders.

9.    Allan Gardens – The Jewel of the Downtown East

 

When Councillor Wong-Tam took office in December, 2010, one of her top priorities was to focus on park improvements in the ward. A park of particular interest is Allan Gardens, established in 1858.

 

Allan Gardens is enjoyed by hundreds of residents and visitors every year.  Its 100 year old Palm House is the only indoor conservatory of its kind in Toronto.   As the 2nd oldest park in Toronto, Allan Gardens it is clearly a national heritage treasure and Councillor Wong-Tam has been tirelessly working to elevate this park to be one of the top cultural destinations of Toronto.

 

In 2006, a landscape revitalization strategy and management plan was developed through a collaborative effort of residents, stakeholders, and the City of Toronto. The plan was never adopted by City Council.Councillor Wong-Tam has been meeting with city staff and engaged volunteers to discuss how the master plan can be realized and financed.

 

The revitalization strategy and management plan is estimated to cost $15M and Councillor Wong-Tam is inviting local residents, park enthusiasts, and corporate partners to get involved.

 

With the idea of building complete communities and to support families with children living in the downtown core, Councillor Wong-Tam identified the children’s playground as a key priority of the revitalization plan.  In the Spring of 2011, she convened a working group of local parents to meet with a landscape and playground designer to develop a concept for the design of the playground.  A design is currently being prepared and Councillor Wong-Tam will be investing $750,000 into the construction of a dramatically expanded playground with an estimated construction timeline to begin this year.

 

Construction has also begun at Allan Gardens to support the Gerrard – Beverley – Elm- D’Arcy – River Street Watermain replacement.  A shaft site is being installed at the south side of Allan Gardens.  Councillor Wong-Tam has been working with city staff and the construction company to minimize the impacts on the park and will be partnering with local community groups to design public art for the construction hoarding.   A public meeting will be held with local residents to discuss concerns relating to the construction in late January or early February.

10.  Bell Equipment Box Murals

 

In a collaborative effort amongst the City of Toronto, 6 St. Joseph House, Bell Canada, the Church Wellesley Neighbourhood Association, Benjamin Moore and other community arts centres have painted original murals on 16 telephone junction boxes in the Yonge and Bloor neighbourhoods.

 

The initiative is a common effort of businesses, municipal government, community associations and non-profit organizations working together to create more beautiful streetscapes.  We hope that you have a chance to enjoy these murals as you walk through these neighbourhoods in Ward 27.

11.  Community Planning Meeting Update

 

In May and June of this year, Councillor Wong-Tam and MPP Glen Murray’s office co-hosted a series of community planning meetings across Ward 27. The purpose of the community planning meetings were to gather residents, community organizations, resident associations and members of the business community to review the assets of our community and ask members of the community to focus on key priorities for the neighbourhood.

 

Over 200 residents and stakeholders participated in the meetings and shared with us what they loved about their community, what needs to be preserved and also identified some of the challenges and priorities for the neighbourhood.
A report from the results of the Community Planning Meetings is being prepared and will be released in the coming months.  Follow-up meetings are being coordinated between Councillor Wong-Tam and MPP Glen Murray. The dates for the five meetings will be April 2, April 16, April 23, April 30 and May 7. Once the locations of the meetings have been established, invitations will be sent out to residents and stakeholders.

12.  Downtown East Planning Review

 

Councillor Wong-Tam is working with staff from City Planning and Social Development, Finance and Administration on a new planning framework in the downtown east section of Ward 27. The boundaries of the area under review are from Jarvis Street to Sherbourne Street (West-East) and from Carlton Street to Queen Street (Nouth-Sorth). This initiative will provide a framework to support inclusive social, urban and economic development.

 

The first public meeting was held on Wednesday October 19, 2011 at St. Andrews Church and approximately ninety members of the community attended and participated actively in discussions. The purpose of the meeting was to provide information about the study and invite feedback from the community to guide long-term planning efforts in the area.

 

On Wednesday November 2nd, 2011, a preliminary report was adopted by Toronto and East York Community Council recommending further review of the area, including the initiation of a Heritage Conversation District study, the implementation of a revitalization strategy for the area, continued community consultations and the creation of an interdivisional working group for City staff with Councillor Wong-Tam.

 

For more information about this study, please visit: http://www.toronto.ca/planning/downtown-east-study.htm. You are also welcome to contact Giulio Cescato, the Planner coordinating this study at gcescat@toronto.ca or Councillor Wong-Tam at councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca

13.  Yonge Street Planning Study and Framework

 

Councillor Wong-Tam has initiated planning efforts to revitalize Yonge Street’s commercial and public space. This work began earlier  in 2011 with the creation of the Yonge Street Planning Framework by acclaimed urban planner Ken Greenberg and award-winning architect Marianne McKenna, and incorporated the area on Yonge Street from Dundas Street to Gerrard Street. The preliminary report on the Yonge Street Planning Framework was adopted by City Council on November 29, 2011. For more information on the status of this initiative, please visit: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2011.TE11.42

 

City Planning has led in the development of the North Downtown Yonge Street Planning Framework covering the area on Yonge Street between College Street/Carlton Street to Bloor Street and Church Street to Bay Street. A design charrette was held by City Planning in September where members of the community, local business owners, developers and City staff spent a day collaborating on ideas for the future vision of Yonge Street. For more information about this initiative, please visit: http://www.toronto.ca/planning/northyongeplanningframework.htm

 

Together these planning studies of Yonge Street are a blueprint for sustainable and responsible future development and heritage preservation. The process for planning on Yonge Street has been collaborative in nature, drawing on support from local businesses owners, property developers, resident associations, Ryerson University, the Downtown Yonge BIA, City of Toronto staff and TTC staff.

 

If you would like more information, please contact the Manager of the Downtown section from the City Planning division, Al Rezoski, at arezosk@toronto.ca or Councillor Wong-Tam at councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca

14.  Cawthra Park Improvements

 

A community initiative is currently underway to make improvements to Cawthra Park. A public design charrette was held on July 9, 2011. A second public meeting will be held in March 2012. If you would like more information about this initiative, please contact Netami Stuart, landscape architect from Parks, Forestry and Recreation at nstuart@toronto.ca and/or Councillor Wong-Tam at councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca.

15.  Church Wellesley Safety Audit

 

In an effort to improve safety in the community, Councillor Wong-Tam facilitated two safety walks in the Church Wellesley neighbourhood in February and July of 2011. Staff from several City divisions including Parks, Forestry and Recreation, Toronto Hydro, Toronto Police Services and Streets to Homes attended the walks, as well as the Church Wellesley Neighbourhood Association, the Church Wellesley Village BIA and members of the community. Between the first and second walk, a number of issues identified were addressed in 2011. Councillor Wong-Tam is currently finalizing reports on this initiative to determine action items and planning for ongoing initiatives in 2012. A worthy mention will be a new streetscape enhancement plan for the northwest corner of Church and Alexander.

16.  Summerhill Compost and More

 

Councillor Wong-Tam and the Summerhill Residents Association conducted a community walk to identify neighbourhood concerns. She is pleased to report that many issues that arose have now been remedied.

 

On November 3rd, 2011, Councillor Wong-Tam organized a compost delivery with the Summerhill Residents’ Association. Members of the community have initiated a wonderful community garden along the railway tracks on Shaftsbury Avenue. The results of their landscaping efforts will be revealed in the spring. It’s a community story worth celebrating!

17.  Let It Snow. Let It Snow. Let It Snow

It’s that time of the year again. Winter!  And that means snow!

 

As soon as the snow begins, Transportation Services sends out its fleet of salt trucks to the expressways, main roads and local roads.  When the snow stops or snow accumulation reaches 8cm, plows will be sent to the local roads.  Normally, local road plowing will be completed between 14 and 16 hours after the storm has ended.

 

The city will clear snow from sidewalks on local roads where it is mechanically possible to do so after 8 cm (5 cm in January and February) of accumulation.  For Ward 27, property owners are required to clear their sidewalks of snow 12 hours after a storm has taken place.

 

You can always call the city staff at 311 for any snow clearing questions or visit www.toronto.ca/transportation.

 

By working together, we can make sure that Toronto continues to be a safe and accessible city in which to live, work and play.

18.  South Rosedale Gateway Project

 

Councillor Wong-Tam has been working with the South Rosedale Ratepayer’s Association and a local resident, Ray Cowling, on a proposal to install gateway markers at the entrance into South Rosedale.

 

The project would be a partnership between the City of Toronto, the generous support of Mr. Ray Cowling and the South Rosedale Ratepayer’s Association to realize a project started almost twenty years ago.  The gateway markers would beautify the entrance to Crescent Road off of Yonge Street and also mark the entrance to one of Toronto’s designated Heritage Conservation Districts.

19.  Ontario Legislative Assembly Study

 

With Councillor Wong-Tam’s leadership, on September 12, 2011, TEYCC adopted recommendations prepared by City Planning on preparations for an Official Plan Amendment to enhance the protection of the views of the Ontario Legislative Assembly building at Queen’s Park. City Planning staff were directed by Council to undertake a peer review and further discussion with Robert Allsopp, du Toit Allsopp Hillier, the Ontario Capital Precinct Working Group, and the Centre for Landscape Research on respecting the protection of the views of the Ontario Legislative Assembly. A community consultation meeting was held on Tuesday November 22, 2011.

 

For further information, please contact the Manager of the Midtown section of the City Planning division, David Oikawa, by email at doikawa@toronto.ca or by phone at 416.392.7188.

20.  Rinks Across Ward 27!

 

With the winter season comes ice skating! Come discover the joys of one of Canada’s oldest and most popular recreational activities. Arenas and outdoor rinks across the city offer many leisure and instructional skating opportunities. The city’s outdoor rink program will operate until February 26, 2012 with an extended season at some locations until March 11, 2012.

 

Toronto’s 51 outdoor rinks are compressor-cooled, which makes it possible for them to operate in a range of weather conditions. Ice quality, however, may vary according to the outside temperature and precipitation, and closures during the skating season are sometimes necessary.

 

Find updates on rink conditions and information here.

21.  Strengthening Ravine Bylaws

 

Councillor Wong-Tam is working to help close the loopholes in Toronto’s ravine bylaws. For too long, local residents have been seeing firsthand the negative impacts of an incomplete policy to protect these vital green spaces. The Moore Park Ravine and Rosedale Ravines are significant in their contribution to a green city and local residents know that erosion and development could impact them into the future.

 

If you have ideas or feedback on the steps that should be taken to preserve our ravines in a meaningful way, Councillor Wong-Tam wants to hear from you.

22.  New Heritage Conservation District Guidelines

 

The City of Toronto has recently produced a new report for Heritage Conservation Districts (HCDs). These new guidelines were established to increase transparency, fairness and consistency in the process of creating these Districts and subsequent plans and designations. Recent changes to the Ontario Heritage Act (OHA), the Provincial Policy Statement of 2005, and the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada (Toronto City Council) all helped to establish and inform this new document. This report will be before City Council for a vote as soon as February 2012.

 

In the coming months, Councillor Wong-Tam will be holding information sessions for community and resident groups interested in establishing Heritage Districts in their own neighbourhoods.

 

If you are interested in reading more about the new guidelines and general standards for HCDs, you can access them here.

23.  5-year Review of the City of Toronto’s Official Plan


The City of Toronto’s Official Plan sets out the vision for where and how Toronto will grow to the year 2031. The Province’s Planning Act requires a municipality to review its Official Plan at least every 5 years. Toronto’s Official Plan came into force in June 2006, requiring that the City commence an Official Plan Review in 2011.

 

Six Open Houses were held across Toronto in September 2011. These Open Houses were part of the first stage of the Official Plan and Municipal Comprehensive Reviews. A review of heritage policies in the Official Plan was held in December 2011. On January 5, 2012, City Planning reported to the Planning and Growth Committee where the item was adopted with amendments. If you would like more information, please visit: http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2012.PG10.8

 

For more information about the Official Plan Review, please visit: http://www.toronto.ca/planning/official_plan/introduction.htm

 

To share your feedback on the Official Plan, please feel welcome to contact the Manager of the Official Plan Review, Paul Bain at pbain@toronto.ca. You are also welcome to contact Councillor Wong-Tam at councillor_wongtam@toronto.ca to share your feedback.

24.  Overnight On-street Parking Permits Now Available

 

The City, towards the end of 2011, made it possible for residents to acquire a temporary overnight on-street parking permit for their guests. City of Toronto residents can now obtain these permits  for either a 24-hour or a 48-hour time period.  Permits, which are required for vehicles to be parked on streets designed for permit parking, can be obtained on-line.  The cost for a 24-hour permit is $8 while a 48-hour permit is $12.

 

To get a permit, go to www.toronto.ca/transportation and follow the simple, step-by-step procedure. Weekly on-street parking permits can also be obtained through this method. For more information about the City’s parking permits, call 311.

25.  The City’s New Graffiti Management Plan

 

In July of 2011, City Council approved a new Graffiti Management Plan to tackle ongoing City-wide issues with vandalism. This inclusive program drew on the input of Toronto Police, the Toronto Youth Cabinet, the Crime Prevention Association of Toronto, many business improvement associations, as well graffiti artists and community members.

 

The Plan follows upon the heels of a major increase in efforts remove graffiti in the City. In 2011, over 10,000 inspections were conducted and the City achieved a compliance rate of 72.5 per cent. This means that more than 13,000 square metres of graffiti have been cleared since March 1, 2011. Of particular concern is gang and hate-related graffiti, which City staff strive to have cleaned up within 24 hours of reporting.

 

Meanwhile, the City’s Graffiti Transformation Plan continues to support the engagement of youth in the creation of community murals and art to both enhance area surfaces and to deter the tagging of these sites. The Management Plan hopes to continue to create an environment that is both aesthetically pleasing and one in which City residents feel both safe and at home in their communities.

 

Toronto residents are encouraged to do their part in keeping the City graffiti-clear by removing any tagging on their property, reporting graffiti on public or private property with a call to 311 or by visiting www.toronto.ca/311/graffiti/

26.  Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCH) and Home Sales

 

In February of 2011, the Building & Investment Committee recommended the sale of 22 TCHC homes to raise a net profit of over $13 million. That sale was delayed, with the Province yet to agree to the sale of the homes.

 

The idea of selling TCH homes has come up again recently – particularly with the October

14th, 2011, proposal by interim TCH CEO Len Koroneos to sell 706 houses to fund the improvement of other buildings. The TCH Board of Directors received a report on the proposed sales on October 11th that was reviewed on October 21st, 2011. This included Ward 27 homes, categorized as for sale now and for sale later. 287 Jarvis has been designated as a location to be sold now. Locations to be sold later include 257 Dundas Street E., 35 Pembrooke, 21-25 Pembrooke, and 188 Sherbourne. TCH will provide assistance for all those potentially forced to move in the form of help finding a new unit, moving costs, utility reconnection costs, and other help where necessary.

 

Since 2008, TCH has been engaged in a broad effort to reverse the deterioration of its properties. Bond sales, retrofitting, and private partnerships have been other methods used to-date, in order to reduce the overall costs of the TCH to free up resources for higher standards of property maintenance. Costs have been an ongoing concern since 2001, when significant responsibilities were downloaded from the Province onto the City. Presently the City is faced with a backlog of roughly $650 million in capital repairs and needed improvements.

27.  Child Care Task Force

 

The Mayor’s office initiated a Child Care Task Force in 2011 to establish new revenue streams for child care spots in the City and to reduce waiting lists. Without an injection of new funds, there have been suggestions that the child care reserve is going to be exhausted. Unfortunately, exact details have been in short supply and the initial meeting for the Task Force took place under disputed circumstances and without an open and transparent format.

 

On behalf of Ward 27 and Toronto’s larger child care community, Councillor Wong-Tam is calling for the process to be completely transparent and accountable. Various child care groups have voiced their concerns about any potential move by the City towards a for-profit model of child care that will result in closures or restrict the access of poor and middle class families to this essential service.

 

Councillor Wong-Tam successfully moved a motion at City Council to organize an intergovernmental meeting to address the systemic shortfall of childcare funding. It is believed to be the historic first meeting of its kind. Its purpose is to advocate that the Ontario budget in March 2012 provides a sustainable funding formula for Toronto’s childcare delivery system.

28.  Development Update

 

155 – 163 Dundas Street East

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

On November 29, 2011, City Council supported recommendations by City Planning to approve the application that was submitted at 155 to 163 Dundas Street East and 200 Jarvis Street. The developer proposed to construct a 42-storey residential development comprised of a 36-storey point tower on a 6-storey podium. Following a community consultation meeting in April 2011, a working group was initiated by Councillor Wong-Tam with members of the community to discuss this application in more detail with the applicant and City staff. Since the initial community consultation meeting, the applicant has made revisions to the proposal in response to feedback from community members, City staff and Councillor Wong-Tam.

 

For more information about this application, you may contact the City Planner assigned to this application, Giulio Cescato, at gcescat@toronto.ca or 416.392.0459

 

Additional information is available on-line here.

 

 

341-355 Yonge Street

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

On November 29, 2011, City Council supported recommendations by City Planning to approve the application that was submitted at 341-355 Yonge Street. The developer has proposed to construct a nine-storey (51 m) student learning centre for Ryerson University with retail at and below grade. Since the initial community consultation meeting in May 2011, the applicant made revisions to the proposal.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner assigned to this application, Giulio Cescato, at gcescat@toronto.ca or 416.392.0459

 

Additional information is available on-line in the decision by City Council here.

 

 

1,3,5,7 and 9 Sultan Street and 11 St. Thomas Street

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

The applicant proposes to redevelop the site with a 9-storey office building. A community consultation meeting was held in February 2011. Since this time, the applicant has made several revisions to the proposal and a second community consultation meeting was held in September 2011. This application is currently under review and the final staff report is expected in the first quarter of 2012.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Sarah Henstock, at shensto@toronto.ca or 416.392.7196.

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

45 Charles Street East

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

The applicant proposes to add eight storeys and 94 residential units to an approved 39-storey residential building containing 417 residential units and approximately 28, 422 square metres of residential gross floor area. A community consultation meeting was held on Tuesday November 8, 2011 at the YMCA located at 20 Grosvenor Street. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Sarah Henstock, at shensto@toronto.ca or 416.392.7196

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

43, 49 and 51 Gerrard Street West and 695 Bay Street

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

The applicant proposes to construct a 50-storey mixed-use building with retail at grade. A community consultation meeting was held on November 28, 2011. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Giulio Cescato, at gcescat@toronto.ca or 416.392.0459

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

66 Isabella

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

This application has proposed a 23-storey addition to the east side of the existing 26-storey

residential rental unit building at 66 Isabella Street. The addition consists of a four-storey

podium and a 19-storey tower element. In total, 211 dwelling units are proposed

including 199 rental units and 12 condominium units on the top two floors. The proposal

also includes 458 square metres of retail space at grade fronting onto Church Street and

wrapping around to Isabella Street. A community consultation meeting was held in early 2011 and the applicant has since made revisions to the proposal.

 

This application, with amendments, was adopted by Toronto and East York Community Council on Tuesday January 10, 2012.

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Final Report from City Planning here.

 

 

21, 23 and 25 Price Street

 

Proposal: Official Plan and Zoning Amendment Application

This application proposes to demolish the existing 2-storey building at 21 Price Street and a pair of 2 semi-detached buildings at 23 and 25 Price Street used for existing office uses and construct a 5-storey office building with two levels below grade.  A community consultation meeting was held on January 11, 2012. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Diane Silver, at dsilver2@toronto.ca or 416.397.4648

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

2, 6, and 8 Gloucester Street and 601 and 613 Yonge Street

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

The application proposes to retain the existing 5-storey heritage building on the west side of the property at 2 Gloucester Street (the former Masonic Hall including 601-613 Yonge Street).  In the proposal, the existing rear addition at 6 Gloucester Street which includes the back half of 8 Gloucester Street would be demolished and replaced with a 29-storey tower containing 211 residential units and 202 square metres of retail space at grade. A community consultation meeting was held on October 11, 2011 where members of the community attended and shared feedback on the proposal with the applicant, City staff and Councillor Wong-Tam. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Diane Silver, at dsilver2@toronto.ca or 416.397.4648

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

195 Davenport Road and 131 Hazelton Avenue

 

Proposal: Official Plan and Zoning Amendment Application

This application proposes to construct a 9-storey mixed-use building (31.5 metres plus a 4-metre mechanical penthouse), with 38 residential units and one retail unit. A public consultation meeting was held for this application on October 20, 2011. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Oren Tamir, at otamir@toronto.ca or 416.392.7349

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

159 Wellesley Street East

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

This application proposes the redevelopment of the lands for the purposes of a new 38-storey mixed use building complete with retail at grade and 327 residential units above. A public consultation meeting was held for this application on October 17, 2011. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Giulio Cescato, at gcescat@toronto.ca or 416.392.0459

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

94 Cumberland Street

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

This application was submitted in the fall of 2010. A public consultation meeting was held and Working Group initiated by Councillor Wong-Tam for this application which has now concluded. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Oren Tamir, at otamir@toronto.ca or 416.392.7349

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

501 – 521 Yonge Street, 6 – 8 Alexander Street and 23 Maitland Street

 

Proposal: Zoning Amendment Application

 

This application proposes to redevelop the site with a mixed use development with two 58-storey towers (192 metres each including mechanical penthouse) containing 480 units each for a total of 960 residential units.  The towers are proposed on a common 7-storey podium (23 metres) containing above grade parking and retail uses. A community consultation meeting was held on Wednesday November 9, 2011 at the YMCA located at 20 Grosvenor Street. This application is currently under review.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner reviewing this application, Sarah Henstock, at shensto@toronto.ca or 416.392.7196.

 

Additional information is available on-line in the Preliminary Report here.

 

 

9-21 Grenville

 

On October 25, 2011, City Council adopted recommendations from the Toronto and East York Community Council (TEYCC) to approve the zoning amendment application submitted at this site. The TEYCC held a statutory public meeting on October 4, 2011 where City Planning’s recommendations on this application were adopted, and notice was given in accordance with the Planning Act.

The final report submitted by City Planning recommended approval of the construction of a 46-storey mixed use building with 427 residential units and approximately 427 square metres of non-residential space on a 0.134 hectare (0.330 acre) site.

 

Councillor Wong-Tam supported City Planning’s recommendations on this application after careful review of the proposal and consideration of the feedback she had received from the public through the consultation meeting, working group process and general correspondence.

 

After Council’s decision in October, the applicant filed an appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board. Subsequent to this appeal, Councillor Wong-Tam negotiated a settlement with the applicant.

 

For more information, you may contact the City Planner assigned to this application, Michael Hynes, at mhynes@toronto.ca or 416.397.1761

 

Additional information is available online in City Council’s decision here.

 

 

Closing Items

 

Robbie Burns’ Day at Mackenzie House – 82 Bond Street

Sunday, January 22, 12 to 4:30 p.m.

Celebrate the birthday of the famous Scottish Poet with toe-tapping live music, shortbread and haggis!

www.toronto.ca/museum-events

 

For web resources on the budget and City programs, the following websites are excellent:

 

www.togethertoronto.ca

www.commitment2community.org

www.socialplanningtoronto.org

 

 

 

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